Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Perverse scholasticism, but not the sort I complain about. I can disagree with it, but I don't complain about any artist's sense of necessity. And this is hilarious. A brilliant, brilliant, conservative moralist.


This is comic too, and academic, but again criticism maybe, but no complaints. 


Gould's Solitude Trilogy is available on Amazon, Apple, Spotify etc.
And John King, another former student, testifies to Wittgenstein's distaste for British (as opposed to American) movies precisely on the ground of their theatricality. "The Mill Road cinema . . . was the one he most favoured," King recalls, "and here he sat as far to the front as he could get, leant forward in his seat and was utterly absorbed by the film. He never would go to any British film; and if we passed a cinema advertising one he pointed out how the actors looked dressed-up, unnatural, unconvincing, obviously play-acting, while, in comparison, in the American films the actors were the part, with no pretence" ("Recollections of Wittgenstein," in Rhees, ed., Recollections of Wittgenstein, p. 71).

 more. Wittgenstein, TS. Eliot, and legal philosophy. 

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